What do Investing and Physical Training Have in Common?

By Kathy Longo, CFP®, CAP®, CDFA

Monday, 17 September 2018

What do Investing and Physical Training Have in Common?

Susan decided to do something for herself after years of working in an office, raising a family, and focusing on other people. She wanted to get into better shape and knew the health benefits, specifically for women, of incorporating strength and resistance training into her exercise routine. Weight training makes bones denser and helps the body build muscle; since 80% of people suffering from osteoporosis are women, anything to help improve bone health with age is a good option.[i] After trying a few exercise classes and rotating through the gym equipment, she decided to raise the stakes and train for a triathlon. Triathlons involve running, biking and swimming, and are a challenging test of endurance for even the most seasoned athletes. Susan had a goal and she stuck to it, training in preparation for months. She gained muscle, lost inches and felt empowered. She completed the triathlon and started looking for her next challenge.  

The Importance of Money Conversations

Tuesday, 28 August 2018

The Importance of Money Conversations

I am happy to confirm that my first book Flourish Financially: Values, Transitions, and Big Conversations was published just a few weeks ago and will be officially released on September 17. In writing the book, I had the benefit of reflecting on my own money story as well as the money stories of the many clients with whom I've worked over the years. Upon reflection, I identified one very common thread among all these stories—Communication. Whether it was the lack thereof, the abundance of it, or an ineffective or inconsistent approach, communication was the cornerstone of each and every story.

Why do you think money conversations are so difficult? I pondered this same question and while the answer seems obvious, as communication is the foundation of relationships, the real answer lies in something more nuanced. Money and finances come with a great deal of emotion, on top of the practical details to get along in the real world. Communicating about money and finances comes with even more emotion because one must become vulnerable and open about their strengths, weaknesses, challenges, successes, and failures with money. One must also let go of judgment to truly have an open and honest discussion about financial decisions and their impact on life.

Is Socially Responsible Investing the Right Route for You?

By Jay Pluimer, AIF® CIMA®

Wednesday, 15 August 2018

Is Socially Responsible Investing the Right Route for You?

We have been talking to a lot of clients about ethical and impact investing lately. Opportunities to align investment dollars with personal values have become more available as investor demand has increased. It is now possible to effectively make investments that focus on the environment, sustainability, workplace disparities, or gender equality. In fact, from 2014 to 2016 these types of investments grew by more than 33%.[1] The desire to align personal values with spending dollars has already been demonstrated in consumer spending, as 66% of consumers now saying they’re willing to pay more for sustainable goods (a 55% increase from 2014). [i] People are not only buying with the environment in mind, but they are also investing in companies that promote social themes as well.

Back to School: Preparing for College Isn't Just About the Dorm Furniture

By Kathy Longo, CFP®, CAP®, CDFA

Wednesday, 25 July 2018

Back to School: Preparing for College Isn't Just About the Dorm Furniture

I was a wreck when my daughter Maddy went off to college three years ago. I had so many emotions about my oldest child, my first baby, leaving home and venturing out on her own. On the other hand, Maddy was so excited--without an apprehensive bone in her body. She was ready to start her college experience and for that I was grateful. But I had my concerns about her safety, her well-being, her ability to create her own structure with all that freedom, and all the other concerns that come with being the parent of a young adult.

Although Maddy was focused on how she was going to furnish her dorm room and what her roommate was going to be like, she was also looking forward to the adventures and challenges of college. The furthest thing from her mind was worst case scenarios and creating a plan for the what-ifs of adulthood. While the curtains and the rug and the mini fridge all have their place in planning for college life, so too does preparing documents that will protect you as a parent and them as an adult in the event of an emergency.

Surrendering the Lead

Independence, delegation and knowing when and how to find a balance.

By Kathy Longo, CFP®, CAP®, CDFA
Tuesday, 17 July 2018

Surrendering the Lead

This past April, my family and I went to Spain to visit my oldest daughter, Maddy. She was spending a semester in Barcelona and that was a great incentive to take a European vacation. As a planner, it should come as no shock that I often plan my vacations fairly meticulously. I like to know where I’m going and, typically, lead the way. There was something very different about this vacation though, and it taught me a great deal about the freedom of letting go and the opportunities it can open up. When we arrived, we started the trip spending a few days in Madrid, then took a bullet train to Seville for a few nights during Holy Week before flying up to Barcelona.

Contact Us

  • 3300 Edinborough Way
    Suite 420
    Edina, MN 55435
  • PHONE: 952.392.4474
  • FAX: 952.953.3310